(Warning: Video contains graphic content)

It’s no surprise that animals are being used for all different kinds of testing and research in laboratories across the country, but that doesn’t make it right.

Dogs, known for their kind and loyal nature, are often used in testing because they’re “easier to manipulate and less apt to fight back,” explained The Humane Society of the United States.

“Often, dogs are cooperative test subjects because the only attention and interaction they get are when they’re being experimented on,” they wrote.

The Humane Society of the United States has been working hard to rescue these dogs who are stuck in labs for these cruel tests.

Recently, one of their undercover investigators has captured multiple studies, including a one-year pesticide test on 36 Beagles contracted by Dow AgroSciences at the Charles River Laboratories in Mattawan, Michigan.

A video has since been released that shows the dogs being force-fed fungicides at the lab. These dogs used for testing often come from large, USDA-licensed breeding facilities.

The group says they have been negotiating with Dow to have the 36 dogs released to them. The dogs who don’t die from the poison throughout the tests are scheduled to be euthanized in early July.

The Humane Society followed the case of one of those dogs, named Harvey, that they filmed during the investigation. While animals being tested are not normally named, lab workers decided to name Harvey because they thought he was “a good boy,” and very friendly.

Yet, poor Harvey has still been through what no dog should ever go through. Harvey’s chest has a huge scar on it from when they cut him open to pour chemicals into it.

Dow has since released a statement in response to the report published by The Humane Society:

While, this suffering is unfortunately common and most dogs die in the laboratory, there is still hope for these 36 dogs. The Humane Society has made a petition that demands that Dow AgroSciences immediately halt the tests and release the 36 dogs to The Humane Society. Click here to sign the petition.