Kate Chacksfield has been devastated ever since she lost her beloved dog in a bizarre poisoning incident. This unfortunate incident happened after Kate swapped the sugar in her brownie for an artificial substitute.

 

Source: Kate Chacksfield/Facebook

 

Ruby, Kate’s sweet Hungarian Vizsla, had eaten brownies in small amounts before, but it never did her any harm. That fateful day, Ruby ate 2 Xylitol-laced brownies, which was enough to damage her liver and other organs.

 

Kate saw Ruby vomiting uncontrollably and rushed her to the vet’s. She spent thousands of dollars trying to save her pet but the damage was done. Ruby passed away within a week of consuming Xylitol.

 

Source: Kate Chacksfield/Facebook

 

Kate has been busy spreading awareness on Xylitol poisoning now. Xylitol is an alcohol based sugar and is an ingredient in many artificial sweeteners. Kate suggests reading the ingredients on the label of every product before we give it to our dogs. Meanwhile, cases of many such deaths of dogs have been reported over the past few months, with some even dying within an hour of Xylitol-poisoning.

 

Source: Kate Chacksfield/Facebook

 

The Food and Drug Administration officials have released an official warning to pet-parents about the dangers of Xylitol. Foods containing Xylitol include (but are not limited to) – breath mints, candies, jams and jellies, baked goods, chewing gum, cough syrup, children’s and adult chewable vitamins, mouthwash, toothpaste, some peanut and nut butters, over-the-counter medicines, dietary supplements, sugar-free desserts (including “skinny” ice cream), etc.

 

Source: Kate Chacksfield/Facebook

 

The FDA report states that vomiting, low blood sugar, sluggishness, lack of coordination, collapsing and seizure can be taken as warning symptoms of Xylitol-poisoning that warrants an immediate trip to the vet’s.

 

Source: Kate Chacksfield/Facebook

 

We hope people stay vigilant and keep their innocent dogs away from such lethal and toxic substances. Share this vital message and help other pet-parents stay aware of Xylitol’s toxicity to dogs.

 

Click the video below to learn some useful information about Xylitol poisoning in dogs